Cheap viagra in the internet


The ease of purchasing cheap viagra on the Internet raises a number of questions when side effects are considered. Frank Rich’s point is that for patients whose physicians have refused to prescribe them Viagra due to, for example, a weak heart, the Internet is the logical source. In Newsweek, journalist Jerry Adler observes, “You need a license to open a pharmacy, but anyone can put up a Web site and start mailing pills all over the world.” Adler’s article includes a quotation from Jeff Stier of the American Council on Science and Health, who suggests that the Internet “is the new medium for the snake - oil salesman. ”

Buying Viagra online on the Internet inhibits meaningful doctor - patient com - munication. The FDA Modernization Act of relaxed the restrictions of direct - to - consumer advertising: television advertising copy, for example, is no longer required to mention side effects. Rather, advertisers are required only to direct the consumer to other sources for information. The physician, then, “becomes the informational intermediary between the patient and the drug. ” The availability of prescription drugs on the Internet is cause for further concern as the services of physician/consultants are paid for by pharmaceutical companies, specifically to approve the prescriptions of online applicants.

The status of quality - of - life conditions is, of course, a huge “money” issue. Erectile dysfunction - as a quality - of - life condition - and Viagra - its cure - define expectations for “normal” masculine performances of sexual health. The fact that pharmaceutical companies drive these expectations for the primary purpose of increasing stock market share prices is extremely problematic. The introduction of quality - of - life condition reimbursement and treatment, in and of themselves, creates expectations for health coverage that will, no doubt, tax an already financially vulnerable and inequitable U.S. healthcare system. The body’s absorption of a pill - simple and discreet - has become, in microcosm, a symbol of the quick - fix mentality of a society not interested in repairing underlying and multiple causes. Expectations for the body, driven by financial goals, demonstrate the precarious relationships among political economy and identity, capitalism and sexuality, and gendered performances and normalcy.

This post has provided a retrospective of how Viagra has been reported in the news. The analysis uncovers hidden assumptions about the male body, male sexuality, and masculinity and health. These assumptions are not revised or transformed by Viagra; rather, they are upheld. Male bodies are expected to perform on demand - if not “naturally,” then with a naturally performing pill. Male sexuality is defined in one way; performing sexuality requires a mechanistic erection and vaginal penetration, even at the risk of one’s health. Ideally, sex mirrors the youthful experiences of early adulthood with frequent and explosive orgasms defining the norm for all men at all ages. Above all, heterosexual performances of sexuality are valued with deviant, or “queer,” performances scapegoated. These traditional expectations for sexual health are maintained by the current political economy.

Regarding the media in general and these stories in particular, it is significant that today’s Viagra news stories are no longer concerned with how the little blue pill impacts relationships or how taking it is potentially lifethreatening. Instead, stories revolve around competing pharmaceutical equivalents of Viagra (i.e., Cialis, Levitra). Today, stories in the media - by, for instance, CNN’s medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta - matter - of - factly report that million American men have erectile dysfunction without any of the critical feedback that a few stories in my sample provided. Here we see the difference between reporters (who merely parrot press releases) and journalists (who dig deeper). The next post, “Shims and Shills: Viagra and the Marketing of Transcendence,” explains how Pfizer’s own promotional materials have contributed to the absence of those important critical perspectives in today’s news stories about men, health, and erectile dysfunction.